Opinion

Why the woman voter is a myth

By Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux
As Election 2016 approaches, too many people still treat women voters as a monolith on gender autopilot. Not so much, says Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux.

Gentrifying Portland: A tale of two cities

By W. Kamau Bell
Comedian W. Kamau Bell visits Portland, Oregon, to talk to old and new residents and finds a growing social divide involving hipsters and gentrification.

Trump ducks Sanders debate, and we lose

By S.E. Cupp, Political Commentator
Such a face-off would be hugely entertaining and (if it comes off) potentially a huge boost for Sanders--and a black eye for Hillary Clinton.
The 'shadow' of a victim on some steps (left) after the atomic bombing of the Japanese city of Hiroshima by the U.S., June 1946. The person had been sitting on the steps when the heat from the explosion burned the surface of the stone around the victim's body.

Where Hiroshima could happen again

By Jill Dougherty
Jill Dougherty says reading about Hiroshima as a child gave her nightmares of nuclear war with Russia and the risk of those dreams becoming a reality is rising.
MONTICELLO, IA - APRIL 14:  Democratic presidential hopeful and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a roundtable discussion with students and educators at the Kirkwood Community College Jones County Regional Center on April 14, 2015 in Monticello, Iowa. Hillary Clinton kicked off her second bid for President of the United States two days after making the announcement on social media.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Erica Jong: Why I trust Hillary Clinton

By Erica Jong
Who do you want for President: two older white guys in love with their big crowds, or a proven woman warrior who will keep her promises to support children, women and people of color?

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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