Skip to main content

9 places on Earth we know very little about

By Kate Whitehead, for CNN
April 2, 2014 -- Updated 1304 GMT (2104 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison sees three new frontiers of exploration: the tropical rainforest canopy, caves and coral reefs
  • Not having a science degree isn't an obstacle as long as you're prepared to work hard and make yourself useful
  • Dr. Hanbury-Tenison has led more than 30 expeditions since the 1950s

(CNN) -- Forget space.

The most exciting new frontiers of exploration are on our very own planet, says Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison, one of the greats of British exploring.

"I'm excited about this planet and what we don't know about it," he says.

"To discover life that has been cut off for 25 million years under the Antarctic ice cap is just mind-blowing and much more exciting than finding life on Mars," he says.

Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison has been on 30 expeditions over the last 60 years.
Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison has been on 30 expeditions over the last 60 years.

Hanbury-Tenison OBE and an honorary Doctor of Science from Plymouth University, sees three new frontiers of exploration: the tropical rainforest canopy, which researchers are beginning to access by hot air balloon and which is teeming with new species; caves (only 10% of the world's caves have been discovered); and coral reefs, which are revealing more of their secrets thanks to smart technology.

The key to exploring these new frontiers is science.

MORE: 10 of the world's last great wilderness areas

Explore, don't tour

For Hanbury-Tenison, who has led more than 30 expeditions over the last 60 years, the thrill of reaching a place and taking a few trophy photographs isn't enough.

"What is a turn-on is stepping over the threshold from being a tourist to being an explorer-scientist. Then you are actually contributing to saving the world, to enlightening people to what is wrong and campaigning," says the 77-year-old, who has written more than 20 books on his adventures, most recently "The Modern Explorers."

He's not suggesting it's easy to make the leap from tourist to explorer, but it's possible if you're smart about it.

First, you have to know what you're talking about, which means reading as much as you can about your chosen destination.

"Provided you always treat people with respect, integrate and live as near to the way locals are living and not bring in too much from the outside world, you can do good rather than the sort of damage mass tourism does," he says.

There are plenty of places still to be explored on Earth, ranging from "explorer light" to "hardcore explorer."

If you want to get involved and contribute to scientific exploration, lacking a science degree isn't an obstacle as long as you're prepared to work hard and be humble, he says.

Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison with Penan people in 1976 in Malaysian Borneo.
Dr. Robin Hanbury-Tenison with Penan people in 1976 in Malaysian Borneo.

MORE: How to be an explorer

How to become an explorer

Hanbury-Tenison says many of the world's research centers will open their doors if you approach them in the right way.

"If you want to be an explorer, go to one of these research stations, they have amazing ones in Peru, and say, 'I'll sweep the laboratory floor but can I come back when you look for the giant otters and I'll paddle the boat.' Make yourself useful."

Some wannabe explorers yearn for the days when the world was a pristine planet and great Victorian explorers such as Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace went off on journeys and returned with mountains of exciting new material and stories.

But Hanbury-Tenison says there's much more of the Earth left to explore and species to discover and that the mission is more important now than ever.

"It doesn't matter if people have been there before, it isn't about being the first -- it's about understanding and learning more about it.

"And that's more urgent now than ever. We're cutting down the rainforests and destroying them before we've discovered how exciting and interesting it all is."

MORE: Urban explorers: Uncovering abandoned sex museums and decrepit amusement parks

Kate Whitehead is a Hong Kong-based journalist who was most recently editor of Cathay Pacific's Discovery magazine.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
July 18, 2014 -- Updated 0207 GMT (1007 HKT)
Where to pay homage to the cutest local celebrities you'll ever stalk.
July 18, 2014 -- Updated 1310 GMT (2110 HKT)
For air travelers who like to gripe about being cramped in economy, here comes another warning that they've never had it so good.
July 17, 2014 -- Updated 1206 GMT (2006 HKT)
Cream cakes from the Ruszwurm bakery in Budapest, Hungary
Proving they're what's really important, the world's best pastry shops have survived survived sieges, revolutions and World War II.
July 17, 2014 -- Updated 1550 GMT (2350 HKT)
Lois Pryce ignored naysayers and traveled 3,000 miles via motorcycle to discover the real Iran.
July 17, 2014 -- Updated 0320 GMT (1120 HKT)
Built at a cost of $442.2 million, Universal Studios Japan hopes its new Potter attraction will bring in $55 billion over 10 years.
July 16, 2014 -- Updated 1440 GMT (2240 HKT)
A scene in Marrakech
The gateway to Morocco's Atlas Mountains is becoming a photographer's paradise -- but capturing it on camera isn't easy.
July 16, 2014 -- Updated 2136 GMT (0536 HKT)
Cathay Pacific was pronounced the world's best airliner of the year at the industry's leading awards ceremony in Farnborough on Tuesday.
July 15, 2014 -- Updated 2044 GMT (0444 HKT)
Britain has stolen a march in the space race with plans for the world's first spaceport outside the U.S.
July 15, 2014 -- Updated 1453 GMT (2253 HKT)
In the hunt for the world's best amusement park, the people have spoken -- and it seems the people like mixing with creatures who eat a lot of fish.
July 15, 2014 -- Updated 0611 GMT (1411 HKT)
An Hellenic Seaplanes aircraft
Seaplane network set to open up far-flung destinations to affordable jet-setting tours.
July 14, 2014 -- Updated 2052 GMT (0452 HKT)
A man who took a dangerous selfie during the running of the bulls in Pamplona, with the half-ton beasts right behind him, is still on the run -- but this time from the police.
July 15, 2014 -- Updated 0207 GMT (1007 HKT)
Its cramped rooms and retro lobby are dated, but its charm and devotion to customers are worth preserving.
July 14, 2014 -- Updated 0553 GMT (1353 HKT)
A young girl sits on a bench decorated with an image of Paddington Bear.
As part of a scheme to encourage reading, 50 benches designed in the style of popular novels or kids' stories have been scattered around London.
July 12, 2014 -- Updated 0101 GMT (0901 HKT)
To all the locals who have been hoarding the following beaches, please forgive us.
July 16, 2014 -- Updated 1310 GMT (2110 HKT)
Jason Hullinger, a computer security architect in Los Angeles, went to Joshua Tree National Park in December to catch the Geminid meteor shower.
CNN iReporters from across the globe share their incredible images of the skies above us.
ADVERTISEMENT