Skip to main content

Shark's 'man-eater' image undergoes makeover

By Peter Shadbolt, for CNN
February 6, 2014 -- Updated 0429 GMT (1229 HKT)
Love, terror, mirth, disgust -- animals can evoke our strongest emotions; and our perception of creatures is shaped, in part, by culture, researchers say. Love, terror, mirth, disgust -- animals can evoke our strongest emotions; and our perception of creatures is shaped, in part, by culture, researchers say.
HIDE CAPTION
Protect, kill or eat?
From pet pen to plate
Hunter or hunted?
Survival of the cutest
Ugly but useful
Too cute to kill?
Holy cow
Image makeover
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The public profile of the shark has undergone a transformation in recent years
  • Once a feared predator, sharks are more likely to be described as 'beautiful' rather than 'man-eaters'
  • Large and cute animals are subjects of more scientific research than other animals, a study has found
  • While there have been almost 2000 papers on chimpanzees, just 14 have been written on the manatee

Hong Kong (CNN) -- Not since Mickey Mouse raised the profile of the common house rodent has an animal enjoyed such an extreme makeover, but sharks -- once the subject of guts-and-gore horror classics like Jaws and Deep Blue Sea -- have entered the new millennium as "beautiful creatures."

No longer ominous, sinister and man-eating, the Great White shark is more likely to attract the sobriquets magnificent, powerful and beautiful online.

The Western Australian government's decision last month to begin shark culling following a spate of fatal attacks brought out a vocal shark fan club and in Asia, consuming shark's fin, once a delicacy, is now likely to attract disapproving stares.

Australian activists took the bait off drum lines to disrupt the cull and celebrity shark attack victim Paul de Gelder joined the chorus of disapproval.

READ: Balut: The Filipino delicacy that makes the world squirm

Black Rhino permit sells for $350,000
Rare porpoise in danger of extinction
Can extinct species be brought back?

"The ocean is not our backyard swimming pool," he wrote in his blog. "It's a wondrous, beautiful, dangerous place ... it and its inhabitants need protection from those that would do it harm."

When exactly Australian beachgoers went from applauding to protesting a shark cull is unclear, but there's little doubt the one time monster of the deep has undergone a public relations revolution in recent years.

Paul Hilton, a diver and photographer whose photo essay "Shark Fin" won a World Press Photo Award in 2012, says that greater knowledge about sharks and their place in the eco-system has raised greater awareness about the creatures.

"They've been around for 450 million years, they're streamlined, they're perfect for their environment -- it's pretty amazing to watch them swim through the water," Hilton told CNN. "A shark might not be my favorite creature either but it has its place and I know where it needs to be."

READ: Japan officials defend dolphin hunting at Taiji Cove

He said stereotypes about sharks are so strong, they're difficult to shake even when diving next to them.

"Diving with Great Whites is surreal -- the first time you see the shark they come out of the depths but they don't look real; you see the gums and the teeth. They look like something straight out of Hollywood.

"They're obviously killing machines, but they have their place."

Hong Kong-based animal activist Sharon Kwok, whose father was one of the founding members of the Hong Kong marine park Ocean Park, said changing perceptions about shark in China is a slow process but gaining traction.

"In Asia it's becoming quite common to have banquets without shark fin -- it's now the 'in' thing to do," Kwok told CNN. "I still occasionally hear people say 'I don't eat shark fin but I do eat shark meat' -- that tends to come from older people though."

She said people under 40 years old in Hong Kong would not go out of their way to order shark fin anymore.

"If they're served it at a banquet, they might eat it because they don't want to kick up a fuss and embarrass the host. Me? I refuse it. I take pictures of it. I kick up a fuss."

READ: Chinese construction camps eyed as ivory trade conduits in Republic of Congo

She said attitudes on mainland China were also changing and that the need for delicacies such as shark fin were not as culturally entrenched as many believe.

"Here's the thing -- I find that the mainland Chinese are so used to trying to get away with things, I think they've got half a mind frame expecting things to backfire anyway," Kwok said, adding that there was an "easy come, easy go" attitude in China.

Researchers have found that attitudes and perceptions towards animals have even colored scientific studies, with large, dangerous or cuddly animals getting more attention in research papers than their more workaday counterparts.

Looking through studies on some 2000 African animals between 1994 and 2008, South African researchers found 1,855 papers were about chimpanzees, 1,241 were on leopards and 562 about lions.

The African manatee -- which has the unfortunate appearance of a portly and myopic old man -- ranked lowest with just 14 studies.

"A few species commanded a great proportion of scientific attention, whereas for many species information that might inform conservation is virtually nonexistent," researchers Morgan J. Trimble and Rudi J. Van Aarde said in their paper Species Inequality in Scientific Study.

"In the eyes of science all species are not created equal. A few species command a great proportion of scientific attention, whereas for many species information that might inform conservation is virtually non-existent."

READ: Shark culling begins in Western Australia, angering conservationists

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
April 21, 2014 -- Updated 1410 GMT (2210 HKT)
In South Korea, volunteer divers are risking their lives to rescue victims of the sunken ferry.
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 1915 GMT (0315 HKT)
Park Jee Young, 22, helped passengers escape as the Sewol ferry sank -- giving out life jackets while refusing to wear one herself.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1643 GMT (0043 HKT)
What did outgoing manager David Moyes get wrong in his six months with English Premier League football team Manchester United?
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 1736 GMT (0136 HKT)
In honor of Shakespeare's birthday, here are 15 of the world's most amazing theaters.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1734 GMT (0134 HKT)
CNN exclusive: Australian officials are hammering out a new agreement for widening the Flight 370 search area.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1228 GMT (2028 HKT)
Malaysian officials sent to brief Chinese families are armed with little to no information.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1545 GMT (2345 HKT)
When a team of Indian surgeons opened up the stomach of a 63-year-old man, they had no idea they'd extract a fortune.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 0701 GMT (1501 HKT)
Do these photos CNN of gun-toting men wearing green uniforms prove Russian forces are in eastern Ukraine?
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 1711 GMT (0111 HKT)
If the Duchess wears it, then your fashion career is sorted for life.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 0130 GMT (0930 HKT)
Tucked away near the border with Cameroon, this poor corner of Nigeria is no stranger to such brazen, violent acts.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1234 GMT (2034 HKT)
An infant mountain Gorilla sits in the dense jungle canopy on the edge of Uganda's Bwindi National Park in this 29, January 2007 photo. Bwindi, or the 'Impenetrable Forest' as it is known to many tourists is home to the majority of Uganda's rare and endangered mountain gorilla population where plans are underway to habituate two more gorilla family groups to counter growing demand from a flourishing gorilla trek tourism business, a major source of income for the Uganda tourism Authority. AFP PHOTO / STUART PRICE. (Photo credit should read STUART PRICE/AFP/Getty Images)
Tthe constant threat of poaching, deforestation and human diseases means the world's mountain gorillas could be completely wiped out.
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 1333 GMT (2133 HKT)
Prince George takes a special interest in an Australian animal on a zoo trip.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 0202 GMT (1002 HKT)
How could a teenage stowaway survive hours in a jet's sub-zero wheel well at 38,000 feet?
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 2315 GMT (0715 HKT)
Browse through images you don't always see on news reports from CNN teams around the world.
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 1058 GMT (1858 HKT)
See what life is like for superyacht stewardesses-in-training. One thing's for certain -- they can never say "no."
April 22, 2014 -- Updated 0257 GMT (1057 HKT)
Home of Bruce Lee, divine dim sum, lofty buildings, loftier real estate prices and easy access to the great outdoors.
ADVERTISEMENT