Skip to main content

British police knock down Princess Diana murder claim

By CNN Staff
December 17, 2013 -- Updated 0329 GMT (1129 HKT)
Diana, Princess of Wales listens to children during a visit to the British international school in Jakarta, Indonesia, on November 6, 1989. Diana, Princess of Wales listens to children during a visit to the British international school in Jakarta, Indonesia, on November 6, 1989.
HIDE CAPTION
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
Life of Princess Diana
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Claim alleges British military was involved in Princess Diana's death
  • There is "no credible evidence" to support such an allegation, say police
  • Diana died alongside her boyfriend and their driver in a Paris car crash

(CNN) -- There is "no credible evidence" to support a claim that the British military was involved in the deaths of Princess Diana, her boyfriend and their driver, according to London's Metropolitan Police.

The allegation first surfaced in August, roughly 16 years after the woman who would now be a royal grandmother died in a Paris car crash. Officers were tasked with looking into whether there was any truth to it.

"Every reasonable line of enquiry was objectively pursued in order to fully evaluate any potential evidence," police said in a statement released overnight Monday.

"The final conclusion is that whilst there is a possibility the alleged comments in relation to the SAS's involvement in the deaths may have been made, there is no credible evidence to support a theory that such claims had any basis in fact."

Cops: No evidence of Princess Diana plot
Kate vs. Diana
Princess Diana's dresses for sale

SAS is short for Britain's elite Special Air Service.

Wildly popular in life and death, Diana died on August 31, 1997, after the car she was riding in slammed into a pillar in a Paris overpass. Her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, and their driver, Henri Paul, also died.

Investigators concluded that Paul was drunk and speeding when the accident occurred, and despite at least three inquiries -- including a lengthy London police inquiry that poured cold water on all forms of conspiracy theories in Diana's death -- whispers of collusion and cover-up have persisted.

Rare photo of teenage Diana sold

The latest claim, published by Press Association, the Sunday People newspaper and other British media outlets, alleged that members of Britain's elite SAS commando unit were involved in assassinating Diana.

The claim appears to have been sent first to military authorities and then to London police by the parents-in-law of a British special forces sniper after his marriage had fallen apart, according to an article on the website of the Sunday People newspaper. It did not offer a source for its reporting, but the paper indicated that the parents were questioning the integrity of the soldier, who had testified in another soldier's court-martial.

Sunday People said it had seen a seven-page handwritten letter by the in-laws alleging that the soldier, whom the newspaper did not name, had boasted to his wife that the commando unit was behind the deaths.

Neither the Sunday People piece nor an earlier version carried by Press Association offered details of the claimed involvement by soldiers in the deaths.

The princess left behind her two children, Prince William, whose wife recently gave birth to Diana's first grandchild, and Prince Harry. Some 2.5 billion people around the world watched Diana's funeral.

Princess Diana's favorite fairytale dress could be yours

CNN's Michael Pearson, Atika Shubert and Erin McLaughlin contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
November 24, 2014 -- Updated 0051 GMT (0851 HKT)
Where do hip young things hang out in Taiwan?
November 24, 2014 -- Updated 0118 GMT (0918 HKT)
The interior of the Formosa Boulevard Mass Rapid Transit Station in Kaohsiung, in southern Taiwan.
Stunning stations where your first priority won't be finding the nearest exit.
November 24, 2014 -- Updated 1043 GMT (1843 HKT)
A 30-year-old woman has been charged with attempting to kill a baby police say spent five days down a drain before being discovered by cyclists.
November 21, 2014 -- Updated 0121 GMT (0921 HKT)
If it wasn't for a comic's skit, Bill Cosby would still be America's favorite father, says expert.
November 21, 2014 -- Updated 1550 GMT (2350 HKT)
Obama orders the most sweeping overhaul of U.S. immigration in decades, prioritizing the deportation of "felons, not families."
November 18, 2014 -- Updated 2106 GMT (0506 HKT)
Fighters loyal to ISIS are now in control of Derna, a city on Libya's Mediterranean coast.
November 21, 2014 -- Updated 2319 GMT (0719 HKT)
China and likely other countries have the capacity to shut down the U.S. power grid, says the NSA.
November 19, 2014 -- Updated 1945 GMT (0345 HKT)
The founder of a U.S. nonprofit that works with returning soldiers is named CNN's Hero of the Year.
November 17, 2014 -- Updated 1738 GMT (0138 HKT)
A Syrian cleric condemns ISIS and its execution of U.S. hostage Peter Kassig.
November 18, 2014 -- Updated 1729 GMT (0129 HKT)
TV anchor wears the same suit for a year. Female colleague wears new outfit daily. Who gets criticized?
November 24, 2014 -- Updated 1523 GMT (2323 HKT)
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT