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Backlash over police tips for Beijing's women drivers

Could this be included as excessive decoration in the eyes of Beijing police?

Story highlights

  • Beijing Police Weibo account: Female drivers "usually have inadequate driving skills"
  • Advises women to avoid wearing heels and to avoid excessive decoration in their cars
  • Many users on Chinese social media slammed police for discriminatory post

Police in China's capital are in a jam after publishing guidance for "inadequate" women drivers online.

According to a post on the official Beijing Police department account on Weibo -- China's popular micro-blogging service -- female drivers "usually have inadequate driving skills and often lack a sense of direction."

If that wasn't news enough for China's female roadsters, it added women drivers "tend to get in a panic after an accident and usually draw a complete mental blank, giving opportunities for criminals."

Aside from questionable skills at the wheel, the police pointed out a few other potential perils to avoid, such as wearing high heels or driving without tying your hair back.

Apparently excessive decorations in your car may also bring danger.

Another official police post features a cartoon of a confrontation between a policeman and a woman driving a vehicle shaped like a large high heel. "Women drivers, please change into flat shoes when you're driving," the caption warns.

While Beijing police could not immediately be contacted for comment, another post on its account cited a China News article, which claimed almost 70% of road accidents in China are caused by women.

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Unsurprisingly, the police post provoked a backlash on social media.

"Many male drivers are no different. They think they are good at driving, but most car crashes are caused by men," said one user on Weibo, called Shantianxinzai.

"This is the first time I saw pure gender discrimination from the authorities," said another, identified as Jifengliuyang.

"Obvious gender discrimination, if it's in the U.S., they will get sued," declared Miaoxingrendenvpu.

Others, meanwhile, sided with police.

"I have to say that female drivers are worse drivers," claimed Simapingbang.