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Suzanne Pettersen overhauls 16-year-old Lydia Ko for Evian glory

September 15, 2013 -- Updated 2102 GMT (0502 HKT)
Norway's Suzann Pettersen enjoys the spoils of success after claiming the final women's major of the season.
Norway's Suzann Pettersen enjoys the spoils of success after claiming the final women's major of the season.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Suzann Pettersen wins final major of women's golf season
  • Norwegian claims Evian Championship in France
  • Beats 16-year-old amateur Lydia Ko by two shots
  • Joost Luiten claims Dutch Open after playoff with Miguel Angel Jimenez

(CNN) -- Suzann Pettersen denied 16-year-old amateur Lydia Ko a fairtytale first major triumph as the Norwegian took the Evian Championship in France Sunday.

The 32-year-old Norwegian carded a final round 68 to hold off Ko in the fifth and final major of the women's season.

The tournament -- which was awarded major status for the first time this year -- had been reduced to 54 holes due to inclement weather conditions.

Pettersen's 10-under-par total of 203 left her two shots clear of New Zealand's Ko, who was born in South Korea.

Ko, a prodigious teenage talent, has already accumulated four wins on the professional LPGA Tour, but could not match her more experienced rival on the final day, carding a one-under 70.

Why add a fifth women's golf major?
Korean woman to make golf history?

As overnight leader Mika Miyazato of Japan fell away to a 79, Ko hit the front with a birdie at the first hole.

But Pettersen, one of the stars of Europe's Solheim Cup win last month, went ahead with a birdie at the eighth.

She had a brief scare when finding the trees on the par four 17th but recovered to wrap up her second career major crown.

Read: Europe crush U.S. to win Solheim Cup

"It's great to win another major and this one has definitely been well worth waiting for," Pettersen said.

Ko, who broke records when she won the Canadian Open last year at 15 years and four months, refused to be downhearted.

"It has been a great week," she said. "I didn't take all my chances but Suzann played really well."

Another talented teen, American Lexi Thompson, carded a final round 68 to claim third place on six under.

Meet an 11-year-old golf prodigy
Women golfers face off at Solheim Cup

But World No.1 Park Inbee of South Korea, was never in serious contention as she strove to become the first player to win four majors in a season.

Park, who won the first three majors of the season, finished tied 67th on eight over.

On the men's European Tour, home player Joost Luiten captured the Dutch Open at Zandvoort after a playoff with evergreen Spanish veteran Miguel Angel Jimenez.

It was Luiten's second win of the season and came after he tied with Jimenez on 12-under in regulation play.

Read: There's more to life than golf - Jimenez

He only needed to two putt for a par at the first extra hole to seal an emotional triumph as 49-year-old Jimenez overhit his birdie attempt and missed the six-foot return.

"Winning your home Open is like winning a major and this is how this win feels," said the 27-year-old Luiten

"I went close a few years ago in but to win now feels just unbelievable and I think it won't be later tonight when it all sinks in."

Former three-time champion Simon Dyson finished in a tie for third with fellow Englishman Ross Fisher, Ireland's Damien McGrane and France's Gregory Havret -- three shots adrift.

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