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Henrik Stenson rises to the top of FedEx Cup rankings

September 3, 2013 -- Updated 1049 GMT (1849 HKT)
Sweden's Henrik Stenson turned pro in 1998 and joined the PGA Tour in 2007.
Sweden's Henrik Stenson turned pro in 1998 and joined the PGA Tour in 2007.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Henrik Stenson wins the Deutsche Bank Championship by two shots
  • The Swede finished a tournament record-equaling 22-under par in Boston
  • The win propels the new world No. 6 to the top of the FedEx Cup standings
  • The winner of the FedEx Cup collects a check for $10 million

(CNN) -- Henrik Stenson capped his recent rise with a record-equaling victory at the Deutsche Bank Championship which propelled the Swede to the top of the FedEx Cup standings.

The new world No. 6 carded a five-under-par final round of 66 to finish 22 under for the tournament, tying the record score set by Vijay Singh in 2008.

Stenson finished two strokes clear of American Steve Stricker at the rain-delayed event in Boston, putting him in pole position to collect the $10 million FedEx Cup winner's check.

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"I'm just pleased I won here," the 37-year-old told the PGA Tour's official website.

"This was a big goal of mine to win a golf tournament after all those nice finishes. My family is here. I'm going to see my kids in a little bit. It's all good."

Stenson has enjoyed a fine couple of months. He finished as runner-up to Phil Mickelson at July's British Open in addition to a third-place finish at last month's PGA Championships.

Read: Tseng bouncing back to No. 1?

The $1.4 million victory, his third on the PGA Tour, saw him usurp world No. 1 Tiger Woods as the leader of the FedEx Cup standings with just two tournaments left of the series.

The Deutsche Bank Championship is the second of four FedEx Cup playoff events.

The top 70 players in the FedEx Cup standings will now progress to play in the BMW Championships, with the top 30 players then advancing to the series-ending Tour Championship.

The player who finishes top of the FedEx Cup standings following the Tour Championship picks up a check for $10 million.

Last year's event was won by American Brandt Snedeker.

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