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In last 20 years, two Asiana crashes resulted in deaths

By Joe Sterling, CNN
July 8, 2013 -- Updated 0019 GMT (0819 HKT)
In this handout photo released by the National Transportation Safety Board, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 sits just off the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Sunday, July 7. The Boeing 777 coming from Seoul, South Korea, crashed on landing on Saturday, July 6. Three passengers, all girls, died as a result of the first notable U.S. air crash in four years. In this handout photo released by the National Transportation Safety Board, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 sits just off the runway at San Francisco International Airport on Sunday, July 7. The Boeing 777 coming from Seoul, South Korea, crashed on landing on Saturday, July 6. Three passengers, all girls, died as a result of the first notable U.S. air crash in four years.
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Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
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Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
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Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
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Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
Plane crash-lands in San Francisco
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Twenty years ago, 68 people died in a crash
  • Two years ago, two people perished in a cargo plane crash
  • Last decade, a collision was averted in LA and a flight landed safely after losing an engine

(CNN) -- Asiana Airlines had coped with a pair of deadly crashes over the past 20 years before a Boeing 777 crash landed in San Francisco and burst into flames on Saturday.

A crash nearly 20 years ago near South Korea's Mokpo Airport killed 68 out of 116 occupants. Flight 733 -- a Boeing 737-500 -- went down in poor weather on July 26, 1993, as the plane was attempting its third landing, the Aviation Safety Network said.

In July 2011, a cargo plane slammed into the East China Sea, killing the only two people on board, CNN reported.

The Boeing 777-200LR has been in service since March 2006

The plane can carry 301 passengers and travel a maximum distance of 9,395 nautical miles

Asiana Airlines operates 71 aircraft and serves 14.7 million passengers annually

The airline was voted Airline of the Year by Global Traveler in 2011

In 1993, Asiana Airlines Boeing 737 crashed killing 68 people

The plane was a Boeing 747-400F. The plane crashed en route from Seoul's Incheon International Airport to Shanghai Pudong International Airport in China.

At least two deaths and dozens of injuries were reported in Saturday's incident.

Expert: Shouldn't have been close to hitting seawall

Close call and a lost engine

In August 2004, a collision between Asiana Airlines Boeing 747 and Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 at the Los Angeles International Airport was narrowly averted, CNN reported.

A controller gave the Southwest flight clearance to take off from the runway. But with only seconds to spare, the Asiana pilot spotted the Southwest plane and aborted his landing, saving both planes. An air traffic control error caused the mishap, officials said.

An Asiana Airlines flight landed safely in April 2009 after losing one of two engines following takeoff from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, CNN reported. An airport spokeswoman said no one was hurt during the emergency landing. The plane was scheduled to fly to South Korea.

Video shows plane's moment of impact
Survivor: I thought 'I'm dying'
'He saw her leg hanging mid air'
Passengers describe harrowing crash

Why crash was survivable

Minor accidents

Two minor incidents occurred in the United States in November 1998, the National Transportation Safety Board said.

An Asiana Airlines Boeing 747-400 taxiing at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Anchorage, Alaska, collided with a parked Aeroflot Ilyushin Il-62. There was one minor injury. An Asiana Boeing 747 struck a crane in Jamaica, New York. One person was injured, according to the NTSB.

A Boeing 767 approaching Cheju airport in South Korea had a hard landing in January 1992. No one was injured. An Asiana Airlines Airbus was damaged when the tail struck the runway on landing at Osaka-Kansai International Airport in Japan. There were no injuries in the October 2009 incident.

Asiana, based in Seoul, is one of South Korea's two major airlines. In addition to domestic flights in South Korea, the 25-year-old airline operates in 23 other countries, according to Asiana's website.

Latest developments in the San Francisco crash landing

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Part of complete coverage on
Asiana Flight 214 crash
July 9, 2013 -- Updated 0943 GMT (1743 HKT)
The two teen girls were close friends, each looking forward to a summer trip to California to improve their English.
July 9, 2013 -- Updated 1435 GMT (2235 HKT)
After 10 long hours in the sky, the Jang children couldn't wait to get off the plane.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 1034 GMT (1834 HKT)
I didn't expect my 5-year-old daughter to first learn about airplane crashes while we were in the air.
July 17, 2013 -- Updated 0241 GMT (1041 HKT)
Passengers who were aboard Asiana Airlines Flight 214, which crashed in San Francisco, began legal action against Boeing Co., which made the plane, according to a law firm representing passengers.
July 17, 2013 -- Updated 1345 GMT (2145 HKT)
The names, which some liken to slurs, spread everywhere -- triggering anger in the United States as well as South Korea.
July 12, 2013 -- Updated 1042 GMT (1842 HKT)
Shortly after Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed in San Francisco, passengers and witnesses pleaded with 911 responders to send help -- some frantically, some insistently.
Here's what we know about the crash landing, told through animation and graphics.
July 9, 2013 -- Updated 1429 GMT (2229 HKT)
As a plume of black smoke billowed from Asiana Airlines flight 214 after it crash landed, images were captured of passengers collecting their carry-on items before evacuating.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 1946 GMT (0346 HKT)
Inside the cockpit of the Airbus A380 at Le Bourget airport on June 12, 2005.
Pilots will need more cockpit training to become fully certified first officers for U.S. passenger and cargo airlines.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 0600 GMT (1400 HKT)
Veteran flight attendant Lee Yoon Hye sensed something was awry as Flight 214 neared the San Francisco International Airport runway.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 1614 GMT (0014 HKT)
As Asiana Airlines Flight 214 flew into San Francisco, the Boeing 777's 219 passengers didn't know that the man at the controls had never landed this kind of plane at this airport before.
July 8, 2013 -- Updated 1351 GMT (2151 HKT)
"Look at that one -- look at how his nose is up in the air."
July 8, 2013 -- Updated 0041 GMT (0841 HKT)
Of the 307 people on board, only two are confirmed dead.
July 8, 2013 -- Updated 0036 GMT (0836 HKT)
Nearly three hours after the crash, David Eun walked through customs at San Francisco International Airport. By then, the adrenaline rush was subsiding enough that he could begin processing the enormity of it all.
July 19, 2013 -- Updated 1752 GMT (0152 HKT)
Photos from the scene show a trail of debris down the runway and people waiting for their loved ones.
July 8, 2013 -- Updated 0019 GMT (0819 HKT)
Asiana Airlines had coped with a pair of deadly crashes over the past 20 years before a Boeing 777 crash landed in San Francisco and burst into flames on Saturday.
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