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Mickelson in the mood in Memphis

June 8, 2013 -- Updated 2245 GMT (0645 HKT)
Phil Mickelson is all smiles as he charges into contention at the St. Jude Classic in Memphis
Phil Mickelson is all smiles as he charges into contention at the St. Jude Classic in Memphis
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Phil Mickelson shoots a fine 65 in third round of St. Jude Classic
  • He trails leader Shawn Stefani by five shots
  • Ireland's Padraig Harrington also moves up after a 65
  • Joost Luiten leads European Tour event in Austria by three shots

(CNN) -- Phil Mickelson served a timely reminder of his talents on the eve of the U.S. Open with a third round 65 Saturday at the St. Jude Classic in Memphis.

Mickelson ripped into the TPC Southwind course with six birdies and an eagle, tuning up his form ahead of the second major of the season at Merion next week.

"I could really get some glimpses of my game getting where I want it," he told the official PGA Tour website.

"Hopefully, I'll put together a really low round (Sunday) and catch the leaders."

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He will need to pick up five shots on rookie Shawn Stefani, who shrugged off a quadruple bogey on the way to a superb 66 for 12-under 198.

The 31-year-old Texan led halfway leader Harris English by a stroke. He shot a 69.

Former three-time major winner Padraig Harrington also moved up after matching Mickelson's 65 in early play, the Irishman lying six shots back on six-under 204.

On the European Tour, Dutchman Joost Luiten led after the third round of the Lyoness Open at Atzenbrugg in Austria.

He carded a five-under 67 for 14-under 200, three clear of Spanish pair Eduardo De La Riva and Jorge Campillo.

Ryder Cup veteran Miguel Angel Jimenez trailed by six shots after a 69.

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