Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

Brazil unveils shaky answer to the vuvuzela for World Cup

By Sarah Holt, CNN
July 24, 2013 -- Updated 1514 GMT (2314 HKT)
The World Cup in Brazil will be filled with many noises. But what sound will the caxirola, which will be musical instrument of choice for the 2014 World Cup, make? The World Cup in Brazil will be filled with many noises. But what sound will the caxirola, which will be musical instrument of choice for the 2014 World Cup, make?
HIDE CAPTION
Shaker maker
Shake, rattle and roll
Sound of 2010 World Cup
Old school sounds
<<
<
1
2
3
4
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The caxirola has been unveiled as the "new vuvuzela" for the 2014 World Cup
  • The instrument has been designed by Brazilian musician Carlinhos Brown
  • President Dilma Rousseff has endorsed the caxirola as a fitting symbol of Brazil
  • Whistles will also be produced for the 2014 World Cup

Editor's note: Ready to Play debuts on CNN International on July 26 at 1530 GMT.

(CNN) -- Friends, Brazilians and soccer fans lend me your ears -- the shimmy and shake of the caxirola is coming to a football match near you soon.

The pear-shaped plastic percussion piece is to be the musical instrument of choice for the 2014 World Cup after it was given the seal of approval by Brazil's Ministry of Sport.

About time too some might argue after the raucous cacophony of the vuvuzela -- the long, plastic horn trumpeted on the terraces during the 2010 soccer World Cup in South Africa.

"For many people, the vuvuzela is very noisy, but the truth is that no one forgets," said the caxirola's inventor Brazilian composer Carlinhos Brown, who was nominated for an Oscar in 2012.

"She foretold that we should continue the pace. As a musician, I could not stop and there arose caxirola, a little less noisy."

Read: Mixing sushi and samba - meet the Japanese Brazilians

Why did soccer stadium roof collapse?
Brazil's World Cup countdown
'Pacifying' Rio de Janeiro's favelas
Brazil prepares for World Cup in 2014

If the buzzing vuvuzela, whose raspy monotones drew comparisons to a swarm of angry bees and divided opinion, provided the sound track to the World Cup three years ago, Brazil's aural arouser is based on the caxixi, a woven Indian instrument filled with dried beans.

Designed to produce a gentler sound -- similar to maracas or rainsticks -- and dressed in the green and yellow colours of Brazil's national flag, the caxirola has also been given a ringing endorsement by the country's President Dilma Rousseff.

"This image of the green and yellow caxirola, it enchants because of the fact that we are talking about a 'green' plastic in a country that leads in sustainability in the world," she said at the instrument's recent launch.

"And at the same time it is an object that has the ability to do two things, to combine the image with sound and take us to our goals."

Pedhua whistle

Vuvuzelas were so popular during the 2010 World Cup that manufacturers such as Masincedane Sport were selling as many as 50,000 of them a month.

Brown wants his invention to have similar mass appeal when the World Cup arrives in Brazil for its fiesta of football.

"The caxirola as with the vuvuzela, is the ball of the fans," explained Brown. "We want every South American to have a caxirola in their hands."

Read: Brazil stadiums miss FIFA deadline

However, Brazil might not want their musical invention to follow quite the same path as the vuvuzela.

Attempts to ban the plastic horn during the World Cup itself may have failed but it soon found itself on the not-wanted list at global sporting tournaments.

Europe's governing soccer body UEFA banned them from all competitions, including the Champions League, the Europa League and Euro 2012 matches.

Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur were among the first English Premier League clubs to silence the vuvuzela, banning it from their grounds because of concerns over irritation and safety.

Vuvuzelas got such a bad reputation that they were also barred from the Wimbledon tennis championship at the All England Club.

Traditional football rattles, though they were lessening in popularity, also disappeared from stadiums in the 1970s because of safety concerns.

If the caxirola follows the fate of the vuvuzela or rattle, Brazil has a Plan B involving the production of a plastic version of the indigenous pedhua whistle, which mimics bird calls.

So, whoever wins the 2014 World Cup can blow their own whistle -- or do the caxirola shake.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
CNN Football Club
Be part of CNN's coverage of European Champions League matches and join the social debate.
Dutch football team head coach Louis van Gaal (L) and Dutch's assistant coach Patrick Kluivert (R) look on before a friendly football match between Belgium and Netherlands in Brussels on August 15, 2012.
Should the Manchester United board have insisted upon a more radical overhaul of the club's football operation when Alex Ferguson stepped down?
April 23, 2014 -- Updated 1326 GMT (2126 HKT)
Sunday Oliseh plays for NIgeria at the 1998 World Cup in France.
When Sunday Oliseh was a young boy, he never dreamed he would one day carry the hopes of 170 million people on football's biggest stage.
April 15, 2014 -- Updated 1523 GMT (2323 HKT)
The 1989 Hillsborough stadium tragedy, which claimed 96 lives, brought the red and the blue halves of Liverpool together.
CNN's Don Riddell says the 1989 Hillsborough tragedy has caused irreparable damage to the families of the 96 victims and the survivors.
April 11, 2014 -- Updated 1244 GMT (2044 HKT)
The Champions league trophy stands on show during the draw for the quarter-finals of the UEFA Champions league at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon on March 21, 2014. AFP PHOTO/FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Two European heavyweights will collide in the Champions League semifinals after Bayern Munich and Real Madrid were drawn together in Switzerland.
March 24, 2014 -- Updated 1248 GMT (2048 HKT)
West Bromwich Albion's French striker Nicolas Anelka looks on during the English Premier League football match between West Bromwich Albion and Newcastle United at The Hawthorns in West Bromwich, central England, on January 1, 2014.
England prides itself on being the home of football, but is the nation dysfunctional in dealing with racist abuse?
March 18, 2014 -- Updated 1339 GMT (2139 HKT)
In a city where football is a religion, Liverpool and England striker Daniel Sturridge is fast becoming a deity.
March 4, 2014 -- Updated 1555 GMT (2355 HKT)
"Everyone is scared about war -- they are very nervous," former Ukraine football star Oleg Luzhny says of the rising tensions with Russia.
February 26, 2014 -- Updated 1807 GMT (0207 HKT)
Bayern Munich's present success rests on one key decision, chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge tells CNN.
February 18, 2014 -- Updated 0922 GMT (1722 HKT)
Neymar
"More than a Club." It is an image Barcelona has carefully cultivated, but could the controversial deal to sign Neymar sour that view?
February 1, 2014 -- Updated 1825 GMT (0225 HKT)
Affectionately known as "the wise man of Hortaleza," Luis Aragones -- who died aged 75 -- left the legacy of helping Spain's ascension to the top.
ADVERTISEMENT