Skip to main content

Reported Saudi paralysis sentence 'outrageous,' rights group says

By Mohammed Jamjoom, CNN
April 3, 2013 -- Updated 2050 GMT (0450 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A Saudi court has sentenced a man to be paralyzed if he can't pay compensation, media say
  • The man stabbed and paralyzed his friend 10 years ago, the Saudi Gazette says
  • Amnesty International says the reported sentence would be torture if carried out
  • The Saudi Justice Ministry has not responded to requests for comment on the case

(CNN) -- Rights group Amnesty International has condemned a reported Saudi court ruling sentencing a man to be paralyzed as retribution for having paralyzed another man as "outrageous."

In a statement issued Tuesday, the rights group called the punishment "torture," adding that it "should on no account be carried out."

Local media reports about the case surfaced over the weekend.

The Saudi Gazette, an English language daily paper, reported that Ali Al-Khawahir was 14 when he stabbed and paralyzed his best friend 10 years ago.

Al-Khawahir, who has been in prison ever since, has been sentenced to be paralyzed if he cannot come up with one million Saudi Riyals ($266,000) in compensation to be paid to the victim, the newspaper reported.

Saudi women allowed to ride bicycles

CNN cannot independently verify the reports.

"Paralyzing someone as punishment for a crime would be torture," said Ann Harrison, Amnesty International's Middle East and North Africa deputy director.

"That such a punishment might be implemented is utterly shocking, even in a context where flogging is frequently imposed as a punishment for some offenses, as happens in Saudi Arabia."

The rights group calls this an example of a "qisas," or retribution, case, adding that "other sentences passed have included eye-gouging, tooth extraction, and death in cases of murder.

"In such cases, the victim can demand the punishment be carried out, request financial compensation or grant a conditional or unconditional pardon."

Despite repeated attempts, the Saudi Justice Ministry could not be reached for comment on the case.

"If implemented, the paralysis sentence would contravene the U.N. Convention against Torture to which Saudi Arabia is a state party and the Principles of Medical Ethics adopted by the UN General Assembly," Amnesty International said.

This is not the first time a "paralysis as punishment" sentence has made headlines in Saudi Arabia.

In 2010, local media reported the case of a 22-year-old man who was paralyzed in a fight, saying he had subsequently requested paralysis as punishment for the man he'd fought with.

After the initial reports, the Saudi Ministry of Justice denied that paralysis had ever been considered as punishment in that case.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 1255 GMT (2055 HKT)
ISIS has made surprise gains in Iraq and Syria in recent months, but may begin to suffer setbacks on the battlefield.
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 1844 GMT (0244 HKT)
The fear of Russian invasion is receding but peace may still be tricky to find.
August 27, 2014 -- Updated 0023 GMT (0823 HKT)
Convicted match fixer Wilson Raj Perumal boasts to CNN of fixing World Cup games adding: "I was on the bench and telling players what to do, giving orders to the coach."
August 27, 2014 -- Updated 0815 GMT (1615 HKT)
Don't like the country you live in? Meet the people who created their own "micronations."
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 0934 GMT (1734 HKT)
"Princess Fragrant" is the latest effort to foster harmony in China's restive Xinjiang region.
August 27, 2014 -- Updated 0212 GMT (1012 HKT)
The signs exist that indicate U.S. airstrikes into Syria are on the way.
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 0340 GMT (1140 HKT)
AC360 looks back at the most moving moments from Michael Brown's funeral.
August 27, 2014 -- Updated 0244 GMT (1044 HKT)
The mother of a hostage freed after two years captivity says it's not time to party.
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 0946 GMT (1746 HKT)
We asked you what you would like to know about Ebola. Experts answer some of your most common questions and concerns.
CNN joins the fight to end modern-day slavery by shining a spotlight on its horrors and highlighting success stories.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
August 26, 2014 -- Updated 0600 GMT (1400 HKT)
"I just love it when I get milk-to-dark converts," says Kerrin Rousset, before she leads a small cocoa-hungry crowd through Zurich's Old Town.
ADVERTISEMENT