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Public takes shots at Armstrong in advance of Oprah interview

By Ed Payne and Michael Pearson, CNN
January 15, 2013 -- Updated 2127 GMT (0527 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: "Now is when the real work begins for Lance," CNN iReporter says
  • Oprah Winfrey says her team was "mesmerized and riveted" by Armstrong interview
  • "I would say that he met the moment," Winfrey tells "CBS This Morning"
  • The interview will air at 9 p.m. ET Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network

Still own a Livestrong bracelet? Tell us about it.

(CNN) -- The court of public opinion weighed in decidedly against Lance Armstrong, even before the broadcast of an interview in which he is said to acknowledge using performance-enhancing drugs after years of denials.

On CNN's Facebook page, the opinions were passionate and pointed.

"This guy is a loser and a liar!!" Melinda Morgan said. "He is not sorry for what he did, he is sorry that he got caught!!"

Margaret Midkiff said there's no hope of Armstrong reviving his career. "He's lied to folks way too long."

For more than a decade, Armstrong has denied he used performance-enhancing drugs, but he was linked to a doping scandal by nearly a dozen other former cyclists who have admitted to doping.

But Oprah Winfrey appeared to confirm Tuesday on "CBS This Morning" that Armstrong acknowledges having used performance-enhancing drugs in the interview which will air across two nights.

After CBS, like other media, reported that Armstrong admitted using banned substances, Winfrey said she was surprised to see that not long after the interview, news of what he said had "already been confirmed."

Winfrey did not describe Armstrong's statements in detail, and has not released clips or quotes.

After denying the allegations for years, cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. As a result, he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal. Click through the gallery for a look at his life and career. After denying the allegations for years, cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. As a result, he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal. Click through the gallery for a look at his life and career.
Lance Armstrong's rise and fall
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She said the former cyclist was forthcoming in an exhausting and intense interview taped in Armstrong's hometown of Austin, Texas.

"We were mesmerized and riveted by some of his answers," she said, adding that "he did not come clean in the manner that I expected." She didn't elaborate.

Some media outlets have reported that Armstrong has been strongly considering the possibility of a confession, possibly as a way to stem the tide of fleeing sponsors and as part of a long-term comeback plan.

Cycling fan and CNN iReporter Beverlee Ring said she has "mixed feelings" about the Winfrey interview.

He should apologize and do whatever it takes to begin the healing," she said. "Now is when the real work begins for Lance."

But Gretta Michellé said it's too late for redemption.

"He had the opportunity to be honest from the beginning and he should have," she posted on the Facebook page. "Winning was more important."

Sources: Armstrong says he used steroids

Armstrong's admission is a sharp about-face after more than a decade of vehemently denying he cheated en route to winning a record seven Tour de France titles. Cycling's international governing body, the UCI, stripped the titles from Armstrong following a report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that found widespread evidence of Armstrong's involvement in a sophisticated doping program.

The interview will air over two nights, beginning at 9 p.m. ET Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network. Winfrey has promised a "no-holds-barred" interview, with no conditions and no payment made to Armstrong.

Read more: Oprah interview with Lance Armstrong airs January 17

"I hope the ratings are (a) record low on that show," Matthew Black said in a Facebook comment.

Winfrey declined to characterize Armstrong's statements, saying she preferred that viewers make up their own minds. She said the interview was at times emotional and surprisingly intense.

"I would say that he met the moment," she said.

Word that Armstrong may have allowed some emotion to show through didn't seem to soften many critics.

"Go ahead and cry, Lance ... it won't help you one bit," Lori Polacek said. You "blew it a long time ago!"

Cancer charity: The trump card?

Some were willing to cut Armstrong a break because of his long-running cancer charity: the Livestrong Foundation.

"Who cares?" said Pedro Murillo. "He raised so much for cancer research, that's more important (than) if he doped for some races."

Armstrong's demise: How an all-American hero fell to earth

David Flowe said he doesn't care if Armstrong was involved in doping or if he even confesses to it.

"The man is an inspiration for those battling cancer," he said. "Quit being so judgmental of others especially someone who has done so much good for the world!"

Armstrong, 41, has been an icon for his cycling feats and celebrity, bringing more status to a sport wildly popular in some nations but lacking big-name recognition, big money and mass appeal in the United States.

He fought back from testicular cancer to win the Tour de France from 1999 to 2005. He raised millions via his Lance Armstrong Foundation to help cancer victims and survivors, an effort illustrated by trendy yellow "LiveSTRONG" wristbands that helped bring in the money.

Before the interview with Winfrey, the disgraced cycling legend apologized to the staff of his cancer charity, a publicist for Livestrong Foundation said.

Armstrong was tearful during the 15-minute meeting and didn't address the issue of steroid use in cycling, said Rae Bazzarre, director of communications for the foundation.

Bazzarre added that Armstrong offered to the staff a "sincere and heartfelt apology for the stress they've endured because of him."

He urged them to keep working hard to help cancer survivors and their families.

Armstrong in talks to return Postal Service money

Banned for life

The USADA hit Armstrong with a lifetime ban after the agency issued a 202-page report in October that said there was overwhelming evidence he was directly involved in a sophisticated doping program.

The report detailed Armstrong's alleged use of performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions. The USADA said it had tested Armstrong fewer than 60 times and the International Cycling Union conducted about 215 tests.

"Show one failed test, just one," Ron Berg said, challenging the wave of public opinion against Armstrong. "You can't, because he passed them all. ... They hate him for his success and tried to fail him, they could not."

The agency did not say that Armstrong ever failed a test, but his former teammates testified as to how they beat tests or avoided them altogether.

Kurtz: Can even Oprah save Lance Armstrong?

Would a Lance Armstrong confession sway your opinion of him? Share your comments below.

CNN's Steve Almasy and Michael Pearson contributed to this report.

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