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How Republicans can win future elections

By Bobby Jindal, Special to CNN
November 15, 2012 -- Updated 2222 GMT (0622 HKT)
Gov. Bobby Jindal says Republicans do not need to abandon their core principles to win future elections.
Gov. Bobby Jindal says Republicans do not need to abandon their core principles to win future elections.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Bobby Jindal: Republicans have been inundated with advice to abandon core values
  • Jindal: Despite losing an election, conservative ideals still hold true
  • He offers 7 lessons that can help his party to move forward and win future elections
  • Jindal: GOP must compete for every vote, reject identity politics, be more smart

Editor's note: Bobby Jindal, a Republican, is governor of Louisiana.

(CNN) -- In the aftermath of the presidential election, Republicans have been inundated with advice to moderate, equivocate, and even abandon their core principles as a necessary prerequisite for winning future elections.

That is absurd. America already has one liberal political party; there is no need for another one.

Gov. Bobby Jindal
Gov. Bobby Jindal

Make no mistake: Despite losing an election, conservative ideals still hold true.

Government spending still does not grow our economy. American weakness on the world stage still does not lead to peace. Higher taxes still does not create prosperity for all. And, more government still does not grow jobs.

Politics: Jindal stays quiet on 2016 House bid

The Republican party does have a lot of work to do. But changing our principles is not a winning strategy. We need to modernize, not moderate. Here are seven lessons Republicans should learn in order to move forward.

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1. Stop looking backward. We have to boldly show what the future can look like with the free market policies that we believe in. Conservative ideals are aspirational, and our country is aspirational.

2. Compete for every single vote. The 47% and the 53%. And any other combination of numbers that adds up to 100 percent. President Barack Obama and the Democrats can continue trying to divide America into groups of warring communities with competing interests, but we will have none of it. We are going after every vote as we try to unite all Americans.

3. Reject identity politics. The old notion that ours should be a colorblind society is the right one, and we should pursue that with vigor. Identity politics is corrosive to the great American melting pot and we reject it. We will treat all people as individuals rather than as members of special interest groups.

4. Stop being the stupid party. It's time for a new Republican party that talks like adults. It's time for us to articulate our plans and visions for America in real terms. We had a number of Republicans damage the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. Enough of that.

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5. Stop insulting the intelligence of voters. We need to trust the smarts of the American people. We have to stop dumbing down our ideas and stop reducing everything to mindless slogans and tag lines for 30-second ads. We must be willing to provide details in describing our views.

6. Quit "big." We are not the party of big business, big banks, big Wall Street bailouts, big corporate loopholes, or big anything. We must not be the party that simply protects the well off so they can keep their toys. We have to be the party that shows all Americans how they can thrive. We are the party whose ideas will help the middle class, and help more folks join the middle class. We are a populist party and need to make that clear.

7. Focus on people, not government. We must stop competing with Democrats for the job of "Government Manager," and come up with ideas that can unleash the dynamic abilities of the American people. We need to lead the way with policies that can create prosperity. We believe in organic solutions, not big government solutions. We need a bottom-up government that fits the digital age. Right now we have an outdated centralized government trying to manage a decentralized economy.

Politics: Jindal slams Romney for 'gifts' comment about minorities, young voters

There are many challenges facing our country. For example, our education system seems to be in the Stone Age and miserably outdated. It's time to update traditional public schools, charter schools, home schools, online schools and parochial schools. Let the dollars follow the child instead of forcing the child to follow the dollars, so that every child has the opportunity to attain an education.

Our energy policy is outdated as well, stuck in old ideological arguments which harm our ability to create a more sustainable future where energy independence can actually be achieved. We have to change that.

We need an equal opportunity society, one in which government does not see its job as picking winners and losers. Where do you go if you want special favors? Government. Where do you go if you want a tax break? Government. Where do you go if you want a handout? Government. This must stop. Our government must pursue a level playing field. At present, government is the un-leveler of the playing field.

This is a pathway forward for the Republican party, one that honors our principles, the American people, and also, will help us win elections.

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The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Bobby Jindal.

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