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A life in hiding: How gay men survive in Middle East

British photojournalist <a href='http://www.bradleysecker.com/' target='_blank'>Bradley Secker</a> has spent the last five years documenting the realities of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) life in the Middle East. In an upcoming exhibition for London's <a href='http://www.nourfestival.co.uk/index.php' target='_blank'>Nour festival</a>, Secker will present a collection of his most powerful images -- some of which are included here -- in a series called "<a href='http://www.nourfestival.co.uk/resources/Nour-2012-Programme.pdf#page=4' target='_blank'>Kutmaan</a>," an Arabic word for the act of hiding or concealing<!-- -->.</br><!-- -->
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Here "Bissam" (not his real name), a 43-year-old Iraqi actor and former translator for the U.S. army is pictured in 2010 standing on top of a look-out point in Damascus. Secker says that it's six and a half years since he left Iraq in an effort to be resettled overseas and start his life again. He told Secker he left Iraq because he was being threatened by a local militia group because of his sexuality and for working with the American army.

British photojournalist Bradley Secker has spent the last five years documenting the realities of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) life in the Middle East. In an upcoming exhibition for London's Nour festival, Secker will present a collection of his most powerful images -- some of which are included here -- in a series called "Kutmaan," an Arabic word for the act of hiding or concealing.

Here "Bissam" (not his real name), a 43-year-old Iraqi actor and former translator for the U.S. army is pictured in 2010 standing on top of a look-out point in Damascus. Secker says that it's six and a half years since he left Iraq in an effort to be resettled overseas and start his life again. He told Secker he left Iraq because he was being threatened by a local militia group because of his sexuality and for working with the American army.