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Goal-line technology enters final testing

March 3, 2012 -- Updated 1738 GMT (0138 HKT)
FIFA President Sepp Blatter wants goal-line technolgy at the next World Cup to stop controversial incidents like this one.
FIFA President Sepp Blatter wants goal-line technolgy at the next World Cup to stop controversial incidents like this one.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Football's lawmakers narrow shortlist down from eight systems to two
  • IFAB to conduct final tests on British "Hawk-Eye" system and German "GoalRef" until June
  • Decision to advance with a system expected to be made in July
  • IFAB also agree in principal to allow wearing of headscarves

(CNN) -- The use of goal-line technology in football matches moved a step closer on Saturday as the sport's lawmakers announced plans to start final tests on two different systems.

The International Football Association Board (IFAB) said that two technologies -- the British-designed "Hawk-Eye" system and German one called "GoalRef" -- will be trialed between now and June before a final decision is made in July.

"It's an important step forward for us but it is important that we do test it for failure. It must be accurate otherwise it won't be worth having," said Alex Horne, English FA general secretary.

The Hawk-Eye system uses strategically-placed cameras to determine the exact flight of a ball and is already used in international cricket and at grand slam tennis tournaments.

GoalRef, meanwhile, uses a magnetic field and a special ball to determine whether a ball has completely crossed the line or not.

IFAB said six other systems have been ruled out after tests conducted by scientists in Switzerland.

It is hoped that goal-line technology can clear up controversies in major matches and tournaments.

The most recent high-profile example took place in the 2010 World Cup last 16 match between Germany and England when a disallowed goal by Frank Lampard was shown to have crossed the line. Germany went on to win the game 4-1.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter recently indicated he is in favor of goal-line technology and would like to see it in place for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

"We don't want a repeat of the last World Cup," Blatter said Friday.

"I think I can convince the IFAB board that we must go forward with technology -- we cannot afford to just wait and see what happens," he added.

During its Annual General Meeting held near London, England, IFAB also agreed in principal to allow the wearing of headscarves, or hijab, "pending an accelerated review of health and safety." An endorsement is likely to be announced in July, IFAB said.

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